Socio-Demographic and Clinical Profile of Neurological Movement Disorders Patients: A Tertiary Care Hospital Study in Bangladesh

Kingshuk Abir *

Department of Neurology, Tairunessa Memorial Medical College, Gazipur, Bangladesh.

Liton Kumar Roy

Department of Medicine, Upazila Health Complex, Kalihati, Tangail, Bangladesh.

Humayun Kabir Sarker

Department of Interventional Neurology, National Institute of Neurosciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Mohammad Hasibul Hasan

Department of Neurology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Background: Movement disorders may present in emergency medical services in an acute severe form which can be life threatening if not recognized. Neurological movement disorders (NMD) can result from many types of brain injury like head trauma, inflammation, infection, metabolic disturbances, toxins or unintended side effects of medications. In Bangladesh, the relative frequency and spectrum of neurological movement disorders (NMD) have not been studied widely.

Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to assess the socio-demographic and clinical profile of neurological movement disorders patients.

Methods: This was a prospective descriptive single center study which was conducted in the department of Neurology, Tairunessa Memorial Medical College Hospital, Gazipur, Bangladesh during the period from January 2022 to December 2022. In total 43 patients with neurological movement disorders attended the mentioned hospital were enrolled in this study as study subjects. Proper written consents were taken from all the participants before data collection. All data were processed, analyzed and disseminated by using MS Excel and SPSS version 23.0 program as per necessity.

Results: In this study, the mean age of the respondents was 43.47±11.59 years and the male-female ratio was 1.3:1. Majority of the participants were obese (42%) or with overweight (33%) status. Unemployed respondents were the highest in number (44%). Majority of our participants were married (67%) and taken education up to primary level (51%). More than 80% of our respondents were with hyperkinetic disorders (81%) and the rest 19% were with hypokinetic movement disorders; acute cases were found as 61.9%. Majority of the cases (63%) were with moderate, 28% were with severe and the rest 9% were with mild symptoms. As the etiology of neurological movement disorders among our patients, hyperglycemia, stroke and autoimmunity were found among 42%, 19% and 16% cases respectively.

Conclusion: Over aged obese as well as overweight persons are mainly prone to neurological movement disorders. The frequency of hyperkinetic disorders is higher among to neurological movement disorder patients. Hyperglycemia may be considered as the most potential etiology of NMD.

Keywords: Socio-demographic profile, clinical, neurological, movement disorder


How to Cite

Abir , K., Roy , L. K., Sarker , H. K., & Hasan , M. H. (2023). Socio-Demographic and Clinical Profile of Neurological Movement Disorders Patients: A Tertiary Care Hospital Study in Bangladesh . Asian Journal of Research and Reports in Neurology, 6(1), 56–64. Retrieved from https://journalajorrin.com/index.php/AJORRIN/article/view/78


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