Comparison of Prolactin Serum Levels between the Remission and Relapse Phases of Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Individuals

Main Article Content

Mehdi Maghbooli
Zahra Hosseinian
Nazanin Azizi Shalbaf
Arezoo Jafarzadeh

Abstract

Background: The association between serum Prolactin (PRL) levels and disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) remains debated. Studies regarding the role of PRL in the immunology of MS (regardless of gender) have had conflicting results.


Objective: This study aimed to compare the serum levels of PRL between the remission and relapse phases of MS and also between MS patients and healthy individuals.


Methods: This study was conducted on 60 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of MS, 30 of which were in remission while the other 30 were in relapse, in addition to 30 sex-matched and age-matched healthy controls. Those with underlying conditions affecting serum PRL levels were excluded from the study. Serum PRL levels were measured in fasting blood samples. Duration of disease and the existence of enhancing/non-enhancing gadolinium plaques in brain MRIs were also recorded.


Results: Serum PRL levels did not significantly differ in the MS group based on disease phase (relapse or remission phases), gender, the existence of enhancing/non-enhancing plaques, disease duration and also between MS patients in relapse and remission phases with the control group  (both men and women).


Conclusions: There were no significant differences in serum PRL levels between the case and control groups (both genders). Also, no significant relationship between serum PRL levels and disease duration or the existence of active MRI lesions.

Keywords:
Multiple sclerosis, prolactin, remission, relapse

Article Details

How to Cite
Maghbooli, M., Hosseinian, Z., Shalbaf, N., & Jafarzadeh, A. (2019). Comparison of Prolactin Serum Levels between the Remission and Relapse Phases of Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Individuals. Asian Journal of Research and Reports in Neurology, 2(1), 1-6. Retrieved from http://journalajorrin.com/index.php/AJORRIN/article/view/30096
Section
Original Research Article